There are lots of different driving offences but there are few that pop up the most. The most common would have to be speeding, drink driving, and mobile phone offences. One thing that these all have in common is that they’re often committed by otherwise good drivers who don’t even realise that they’re breaking the law when they’re doing it.

For example with speed, you might be distracted by your kids in the back seat or miss the road work sign or perhaps you were overtaking and you were focusing on your driving as opposed to your speed gauge, and before you know it, you’re over the limit.

With mobile phone offences, the problem seems to lie in the fact that what most of us think of when using a mobile phone is quite different to how the law defines using a mobile phone while you’re driving. Things like holding it in your hand or on your lap and how you use your bluetooth, through to where the phone is positioned in the car. All of these factors determine whether you’ve committed a mobile phone offence or not. 

With drink driving, there are a couple of situations that I find very normal everyday people in. One is where they’ve counted their drinks per the old rule of having one of two in the first hour and one every hour after. It has been proven that counting your drinks simply doesn’t work and you can’t rely on that to keep you under the limit.

The other situation is morning after offences. If you’ve had a big night and you need to drive home the next day or even take the kids off to soccer, it’s important to think about whether you might still have alcohol in your system. 

If you found yourself on the wrong side of one of these rules without meaning to, then please give us a ring and we’ll help you navigate the system.

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